New Summaries and Updates!

The South Frankfort to Stamping Ground, KY F4 Tornado and Downburst Disaster of April 3, 1974

The South Frankfort to Stamping Ground, KY F4 Tornado and Downburst Disaster of April 3, 1974

NEW FREE AND PREMIUM SUMMARY SERIES!

Kentucky was hard hit in the 1974 Super Outbreak, with 11 violent (F4-F5) tornadoes tearing through the Bluegrass state. One of these, as of 2024, remains the most powerful in the Capital City area’s history. Although Frankfort proper was spared, the surrounding communities of Avenstoke, Evergreen, Big Eddy, Inverness Estates, Tierra Linda, Jett, and Woodlake faced the twister’s wrath head-on.

It was originally accepted that the twister continued well into Scott County, through Stamping Ground, and to near Sadieville. Little-known analysis years later by Dr. Fujita himself concluded that a violent downburst, rather than a tornado, was responsible for all of the damage beyond Woodlake.

When the dust settled, four lives were lost. Of the 122 injuries, 85 were caused by the tornado, and 37 were the result of the downburst.

Moerdijk, South Holland, Netherlands Tornado - October 6, 1981

Moerdijk, South Holland, Netherlands Tornado - October 6, 1981

NEW FREE SUMMARY!

This is the unique story of a Dutch airliner in 1981 that, by incredible misfortune, encountered a dissipating tornado and suffered an unsurvivable outcome. Four crew, 13 passengers, and one person on the ground lost their lives.

Granbury, TX EF4 Tornado – May 15, 2013

Granbury, TX EF4 Tornado – May 15, 2013

NEW Free Summary!

On the evening of May 15, 2013, a regional outbreak of 20 tornadoes took place in Texas and Oklahoma. Most of these twisters proved harmless and weak (rated EF0 and EF1). However, the southwestern fringes of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex saw two, rated EF3 and EF4, which accounted for most of the outbreak’s property losses and injuries. The latter, and the focus of this summary, only needed 2.5 miles to devastate the community of Granbury, TX, where six people lost their lives.

Luther, TX F2 Tornado – June 5, 2005

Luther, TX F2 Tornado – June 5, 2005

NEW FREE Summary!!

During the evening of June 5, 2005, a massive, discrete supercell meandered across the arid plains of west-central Texas. With a forward speed of just 5 mph, it spent more than five hours over almost total wilderness in Borden and Howard Counties. The storm produced six tornadoes, the strongest of which is the focus of this summary.

Overview of the February 21-22, 1971 Mississippi Delta Tornado Outbreak

Overview of the February 21-22, 1971 Mississippi Delta Tornado Outbreak

An overview page for the devastating February 21-22, 1971 Mississippi Delta outbreak.

On February 21, 1971, the Mississippi delta region was terrorized by one of the worst disasters in its history. Three massive tornadoes, along with dozens of smaller and undocumented twisters, raked across eastern Mississippi with catastrophic results. At least 119 lives were claimed, and another two were killed the following day in North Carolina. All told, nearly 1500 were injured, with small communities wiped from the map. As of 2023, only the 1974 Super Outbreak, the 2011 Super Outbreak, and the Joplin disaster have since surpassed this loss of life in the United States.

This overview page contains links to five premium summaries detailing the three main tornadoes that occurred during this historic event. Available to our Patreon supporters!

About Us

Tornado Talk is a dynamic, information packed website devoted to tornado history! The site contains over 500 event summaries. Our team of writers and researchers dive deep into the details about each tornado event describing what happened through damage analysis and story-telling. Get Hooked on Tornado History with Tornado Talk!

Support Tornado Talk Through Patreon


Tornado Talk is a break-even LLC. That means, we do not aim to make a profit on our work. Our goal is to offset the costs to maintain the business and compensate the hard work of the team of writers and researchers. To put together a summary for just ONE large tornado event, the team could work over 100 hours with research, writing, correspondence, reviewing and website work! We are all doing this while working other jobs and going to school.

To help keep Tornado Talk going and growing, we have a membership program! For as little as the cost of a cup of coffee per month, you can help support our work and become a member of the Tornado Talk team! Learn more by clicking on the icon above!

Contact Us

You cannot copy content of this page