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The Xenia, OH F5 Tornado – April 3, 1974

The Xenia, OH F5 Tornado – April 3, 1974

NEW FREE OVERVIEW!!

On a day that has lived in infamy, the city of Xenia, OH, fell victim to the deadliest of 148 twisters during the April 3-4, 1974 Tornado Super Outbreak. Its track began southwest of the community before the vortex shredded through neighborhoods and the downtown district. From there, the storm continued its reign of terror into the towns of Wilberforce and Cedarville before lifting in rural Clark County. Over the following days, the loss of life rose to 36 people, the majority of which were in Xenia.

Guin, AL F5 Tornado – April 3, 1974

Guin, AL F5 Tornado – April 3, 1974

NEW FREE OVERVIEW!

On April 3, 1974, an unprecedented number of violent tornadoes raged through the Ohio River Valley. By evening, over a hundred had died in the Midwest. Even as the sun went down and activity in the northern half of the outbreak drew to a close, new malestroms ravaged the South. No state saw more suffering than Alabama.

It was into this chaotic atmosphere that one of the most notorious twisters in regional history was born. Under the cover of darkness, it sliced for two and a half hours through rural communities between Lowndes County, MS, and Morgan County, AL. When the deadliest single tornado in the state since 1932 finally dissipated, it had claimed 32 Alabamian lives and traveled over a hundred miles. Most notably, the town of Guin, AL, was nearly wiped off the face of the Earth, suffering the most significant loss of life.

We are honored to share the story of Guin in this FREE overview. More detailed chapters to come this summer!

The South Frankfort to Stamping Ground, KY F4 Tornado and Downburst Disaster of April 3, 1974

The South Frankfort to Stamping Ground, KY F4 Tornado and Downburst Disaster of April 3, 1974

NEW FREE AND PREMIUM SUMMARY SERIES!

Kentucky was hard hit in the 1974 Super Outbreak, with 11 violent (F4-F5) tornadoes tearing through the Bluegrass state. One of these, as of 2024, remains the most powerful in the Capital City area’s history. Although Frankfort proper was spared, the surrounding communities of Avenstoke, Evergreen, Big Eddy, Inverness Estates, Tierra Linda, Jett, and Woodlake faced the twister’s wrath head-on.

It was originally accepted that the twister continued well into Scott County, through Stamping Ground, and to near Sadieville. Little-known analysis years later by Dr. Fujita himself concluded that a violent downburst, rather than a tornado, was responsible for all of the damage beyond Woodlake.

When the dust settled, four lives were lost. Of the 122 injuries, 85 were caused by the tornado, and 37 were the result of the downburst.

Moerdijk, South Holland, Netherlands Tornado - October 6, 1981

Moerdijk, South Holland, Netherlands Tornado - October 6, 1981

NEW FREE SUMMARY!

This is the unique story of a Dutch airliner in 1981 that, by incredible misfortune, encountered a dissipating tornado and suffered an unsurvivable outcome. Four crew, 13 passengers, and one person on the ground lost their lives.

Granbury, TX EF4 Tornado – May 15, 2013

Granbury, TX EF4 Tornado – May 15, 2013

NEW Free Summary!

On the evening of May 15, 2013, a regional outbreak of 20 tornadoes took place in Texas and Oklahoma. Most of these twisters proved harmless and weak (rated EF0 and EF1). However, the southwestern fringes of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex saw two, rated EF3 and EF4, which accounted for most of the outbreak’s property losses and injuries. The latter, and the focus of this summary, only needed 2.5 miles to devastate the community of Granbury, TX, where six people lost their lives.

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Tornado Talk is a dynamic, information packed website devoted to tornado history! The site contains over 500 event summaries. Our team of writers and researchers dive deep into the details about each tornado event describing what happened through damage analysis and story-telling. Get Hooked on Tornado History with Tornado Talk!

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