SPC Stats

Path length: 9.63 miles

Width:  1330 yards

Fatalities:  0

Injuries:  1

Rating:  EF3

County:  Noxubee

Tornado Path

SPC coordinates: Start: 33.0609 / -88.464 End: 33.1484 / -88.3345

Corrected coordinates Based on NWS Jackson damage survey:

Start: 33.059044 / -88.460832 End: 33.141492 / -88.346521

Summary

2011 was one of the most active tornado years on record and it started off with seven twisters that traveled through portions of Mississippi. One of the strongest, was given an EF3 rating. It tracked close to nine miles through Noxubee County. Many thanks to the National Weather Service in Jackson, MS for providing us with additional map data and images!

This event began 2.4 miles to the south-southwest of McLeod. Damage at the beginning of the path was mainly to hard and softwood trees along E. Spann Road.

Twisted trees near the beginning of the path. Image via NWS Jackson.
Tree and power line damage. Image via NWS Jackson.

The tornado moved north-northeast heading toward Paulette Road. Along this stretch of highway, it caused tremendous damage to a dairy farm. A barn, milkhouse, a silo and a mobile home were all destroyed. Large trees were uprooted and several power poles were snapped. A horse trailer was tossed about 100 yards. Debris was found about one mile to the northeast.

Debris strewn across neighboring fields. Image via NWS Jackson.
A lawn chair embedded in a tree. Image via NWS Jackson.
Closer look at the embedded lawn chair. Image via NWS Jackson.
Wrecked barn at the dairy farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Damage from a silo on the farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Damage across the dairy farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Destroyed barn and metal siding high in the trees. Image via NWS Jackson.
Silo damage at the dairy farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Horse trailer tossed 100 yards into a nearby field. Image via NWS Jackson.
Car damage at the dairy farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Demolished mobile home. Image via NWS Jackson.

The twister jogged a bit more northeasterly and destroyed a metal farm building and an office off Stan Tabor Road. An 18-wheeler was pushed approximately 25 yards.

Twisted metal farm building off Stan Tabor Road. Image via NWS Jackson.
Another view of the destroyed metal building. Image via NWS Jackson.
Close-up view of the destroyed metal building. Image via NWS Jackson.
Damage to a tractor-trailer. Image via NWS Jackson.

The tornado continued its trek to the northeast, crossing Highway 14. It was in this area that the greatest concentration of damage occurred. Numerous trees and power poles were downed. At one property, the second story of a home was destroyed, along with a metal barn and smaller shed. A tree at this location was completely debarked.

Debarked tree at a home off Highway 14. Image via NWS Jackson.
Second story of a home off Highway 14 ripped away by the tornadic winds. Image via NWS Jackson.
Another view of the roof damage. Image via NWS Jackson.
Metal barn shredded by the tornado. Image via NWS Jackson.

Approximately a third of a mile to the northeast, shingles were torn off the roof of a home and the windows were blown out. A guesthouse on the property was destroyed. Metal buildings at a pig farm nearby were demolished.

Crushed metal buildings of the pig farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Another view of the damage at the pig farm. Image via NWS Jackson.
Wider view of damage at the pig farm. Image via NWS Jackson.

A before and after view of the hog farm. Google Earth/USGS before and after NAIP imagery taken September 29, 2010, and June 23, 2012.

The tornado tracked for the next 1.8 miles across open fields and then struck a farm off Greenbriar Road. A wood-constructed barn was destroyed. Pieces of the barn were tossed approximately a half-mile. The home only had some roof damage. The tornado traveled another 3.5 miles and no structures were in its way. The last observed damage was to a few trees off Koehn Road.

Sources:

The Storm Prediction Center

January 2011 Storm Data Publication

NCDC Storm Events Database Entry-Noxubee County

NWS Jackson Summary

Joanne Culin-Meteorologist at NWS Jackson

Google Earth

Google Maps

USGS

newspapers.com

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Note:  There are some images/videos in our summaries that were licensed to us to be used only on this website. If you would like to use an image/video in your project or blog, please contact us and we will grant permission if possible.

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